ReLISTO Blog

Environmentally Friendly Leasing and Property Management

Residential Leasing and Property Management

ReLISTO has a new car! Residential leasing and property management requires quite a lot of travel, so you may have seen us zipping around town or parked in your neighborhood! Our new electric 2019 Smart CQ allows us to greater flexibility and versatility to serve our clients quickly and efficiently as ever. In addition to keeping ReLISTO’s team members agile, our little electric vehicle furthers our efforts to reduce our carbon footprint. This means we provide premiere residential leasing and property management services you can feel good about.

For the last 10 years, ReLISTO has been an industry leader in the use of innovative tools and technologies to deliver residential leasing and property management services. From our nearly paperless operations to proprietary online rental calculators, ReLISTO is dedicated to leading the real estate leasing industry in serving not only clients, but also the community as a whole. ReLISTO is aligned with San Francisco’s commitment to lower greenhouse gas emissions by employing greener alternatives for our operational processes. The biggest contributor to the city’s greenhouse gas emission is privately owned passenger cars and trucks.

Because leasing agents and property managers are required to travel around the city constantly to show and maintain property, moving from internal combustion engine vehicles to electric is one of the best ways to cut the company’s carbon footprint. With 44% of San Francisco’s electrical grid running on renewable energy sources, ReLISTO’s use of electric vehicles reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions we would otherwise create by 75%! ReLISTO applauds the city’s efforts to lower transportation-related emissions and is committed to doing our part as an industry leader–providing exceptional and environmentally friendly residential leasing and property management services in order to reduce our overall environmental impact.

Table of Allowable Increases for January 2020 California AB 1482 Tenant Protection Act of 2019

California Rent Control- Table of Allowable Rent Percentages

With the signing of AB-1482  Tenant Protection Act of 2019,  many California rental properties are now subject to rent control.  In advance of the State developing an official guide or rent increase table for landlords and tenants, ReLISTO has put together the following chart to give preliminary guidance on what the maximum allowable  rent may be.  Any rent increase as of March 2019 may not exceed the Max Allowable Rent Increase rate as seen in the table below.  Anything over this amount must be adjusted  January 1, 2020.

The table below lists the maximum allowable rent increase rates* effective January 1, 2020 for all California counties. It takes into consideration the local Consumer Price Index (CPI) for  each county then adds this to 5% as allowed by AB 1482.   This rule applies to all rent increases imposed after March 15th, 2019.

Important note: If your local rent control ordinance provides for a lower rent cap, you are exempt from the rent control provisions of AB 1482 but remain subject to the local rent control ordinance (CAA 2019).

AB 1482 Table of Maximum Allowable Rents for California
County % Increase CPI Base Max Rent Increase Rate
Alameda 4.01 5 9.01%
Alpine 3.25 5 8.25%
Amador 3.25 5 8.25%
Butte 3.25 5 8.25%
Calaveras 3.25 5 8.25%
Colusa 3.25 5 8.25%
Contra Costa 4.01 5 9.01%
Del Norte 3.25 5 8.25%
El Dorado 3.25 5 8.25%
Fresno 3.25 5 8.25%
Glenn 3.25 5 8.25%
Humboldt 3.25 5 8.25%
Imperial 3.25 5 8.25%
Inyo 3.25 5 8.25%
Kern 3.25 5 8.25%
Kings 3.25 5 8.25%
Lake 3.25 5 8.25%
Lassen 3.25 5 8.25%
Los Angeles 3.34 5 8.34%
Madera 3.25 5 8.25%
Marin 4.01 5 9.01%
Mariposa 3.25 5 8.25%
Mendocino 3.25 5 8.25%
Merced 3.25 5 8.25%
Modoc 3.25 5 8.25%
Mono 3.25 5 8.25%
Monterey 3.25 5 8.25%
Napa 3.25 5 8.25%
Nevada 3.25 5 8.25%
Orange 3.34 5 8.34%
Placer 3.25 5 8.25%
Plumas 3.25 5 8.25%
Riverside** 2.8 5 7.80%
Sacramento 3.25 5 8.25%
San Benito 3.25 5 8.25%
San Bernardino** 2.8 5 7.80%
San Diego** 2.21 5 7.21%
San Francisco 4.01 5 9.01%
San Joaquin 3.25 5 8.25%
San Luis Obispo 3.25 5 8.25%
San Mateo 4.01 5 9.01%
Santa Barbara 3.25 5 8.25%
Santa Clara 3.25 5 8.25%
Santa Cruz 3.25 5 8.25%
Shasta 3.25 5 8.25%
Sierra 3.25 5 8.25%
Siskiyou 3.25 5 8.25%
Solano 3.25 5 8.25%
Sonoma 3.25 5 8.25%
Stanislaus 3.25 5 8.25%
Sutter 3.25 5 8.25%
Tehama 3.25 5 8.25%
Trinity 3.25 5 8.25%
Tulare 3.25 5 8.25%
Tuolumne 3.25 5 8.25%
Ventura 3.25 5 8.25%
Yolo 3.25 5 8.25%
Yuba 3.25 5 8.25%

*The data shown has been calculated using the percent change in CPI from April 2018 to April 2019 as published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the California Department of Industry Relations

**March data used when April data is unavailable

 

2019-2020 SF Rent Board Fee Calculator Update

SF Rental Calculator

San Francisco’s calculator to determine security deposit interest and allowable rent board fees has been updated to reflect the new November 1, 2019 rent board fee.   For the 2019 -2020 tax year, tenants may be held responsible for $25.00, depending on the type of dwelling. The following explanation has be quoted from the San Francisco Rent Board Website.

 

Chapter 37A of the San Francisco Administrative Code allows the City to collect a per-unit fee for each residential dwelling unit that is subject to the Rent Ordinance. This fee funds the cost of operating the Rent Board.

The Rent Board fee is billed to the landlord each year on the property tax statement, and the law permits the landlord to collect a portion of the Rent Board fee from those tenants in occupancy as of November 1st of each year. For the 2019-2020 tax year, the rental unit fee is $50.00 per apartment unit and $25.00 per residential hotel room. The landlord may collect 50% of the fee from tenants, which is $25.00 per apartment unit and $12.50 per residential hotel room. For the 2018-2019 tax year, the rental unit fee is $45.00 per apartment unit and $22.50 per residential hotel room. The landlord may collect 50% of the fee from tenants, which is $22.50 per apartment unit and $11.25 per residential hotel room.

Certain dwelling units are exempt from the Rent Board fee, including owner-occupied units where no tenants also reside with the owner in the unit. Units where the rent is controlled or regulated by a government agency, including Section 8 certificate and Housing Choice Voucher programs administered by the San Francisco Housing Authority, are also exempt from payment of the fee. Units rented under the HOPWA program (Housing Opportunities for Persons with Aids) administered by the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development are exempt from payment of the fee as well. Refer to Section 37A.1 of the Administrative Code for a complete list of exemptions. Chapter 37A is available for review at the Rent Board’s office during regular business hours, Monday through Friday and is also available in the Ordinance & Regulations section on our website.

Landlords may “bank” the Rent Board fee since November 1999 and collect it in a later year. This means that a landlord does not have to collect the fee in the year that it was due, but is entitled to collect the Rent Board fee in later years if they so desire. Banking only applies to fees assessed from November 1999 on. A list of prior Rent Board fees since 1999 is available in the Forms Center on our website.

Section 37A.6 of the Administrative Code allows the landlord to recover 50% of the Rent Board fee from the tenant by deducting it from the security deposit interest payment due to the tenant each year. If there is no security deposit held by the landlord, then the landlord may bill the tenant directly. Landlords who pay the security deposit interest annually may bill for the Rent Board fee separately rather than deducting it from the interest payment owed.

The billing statement must specifically state the fee amount owed by the tenant for each year and the amount, if any, of security deposit interest due the tenant for each year owing. The bill should also state that the purpose of the fee is to fund the Rent Board, and that the fee is due and payable within 30 days of the date of the bill.

Please note that a tenant’s failure to pay the Rent Board fee is not a just cause for eviction. The landlord will have to go to Small Claims Court in order to collect the fee.

 

ReLISTO created the Security Deposit and Rent Board Fee Calculator to help both tenants and landlords easily and objectively calculate interest on their security deposit and appropriate rent board fees .

 

AB 1482 New rental laws and the California & San Francisco Allowable Rent Increase Calculator

AB 1482 How to Calculate

October 9th, 2019:  With the signing of AB-1482  Tenant Protection Act of 2019,  many California rental properties are now subject to rent control.  In advance of the State developing an official guide or rent increase table for landlords and tenants, ReLISTO has put together the following chart to give preliminary guidance, based on county,  on what the maximum allowable  rent may be.  Any rent increase since March 2019 may not exceed the Max Allowable Rent Increase rate as seen in the table below. If rent has been increased over this amount since March 15, 2019, an adjustment must be made  January 1, 2020

The table below lists the maximum allowable rent increase rates* effective January 1, 2020 for all California counties. It takes into consideration the local Consumer Price Index (CPI) for  each county which is then adds this  to  5% as allowed by AB 1482.   This rule applies to all rent increases imposed after March 15th, 2019.

AB 1482 Table of Maximum Allowable Rents for California
County % Increase CPI Base Max Rent Increase Rate
Alameda 4.01 5 9.01%
Alpine 3.25 5 8.25%
Amador 3.25 5 8.25%
Butte 3.25 5 8.25%
Calaveras 3.25 5 8.25%
Colusa 3.25 5 8.25%
Contra Costa 4.01 5 9.01%
Del Norte 3.25 5 8.25%
El Dorado 3.25 5 8.25%
Fresno 3.25 5 8.25%
Glenn 3.25 5 8.25%
Humboldt 3.25 5 8.25%
Imperial 3.25 5 8.25%
Inyo 3.25 5 8.25%
Kern 3.25 5 8.25%
Kings 3.25 5 8.25%
Lake 3.25 5 8.25%
Lassen 3.25 5 8.25%
Los Angeles 3.34 5 8.34%
Madera 3.25 5 8.25%
Marin 4.01 5 9.01%
Mariposa 3.25 5 8.25%
Mendocino 3.25 5 8.25%
Merced 3.25 5 8.25%
Modoc 3.25 5 8.25%
Mono 3.25 5 8.25%
Monterey 3.25 5 8.25%
Napa 3.25 5 8.25%
Nevada 3.25 5 8.25%
Orange 3.34 5 8.34%
Placer 3.25 5 8.25%
Plumas 3.25 5 8.25%
Riverside** 2.8 5 7.80%
Sacramento 3.25 5 8.25%
San Benito 3.25 5 8.25%
San Bernardino** 2.8 5 7.80%
San Diego** 2.21 5 7.21%
San Francisco 4.01 5 9.01%
San Joaquin 3.25 5 8.25%
San Luis Obispo 3.25 5 8.25%
San Mateo 4.01 5 9.01%
Santa Barbara 3.25 5 8.25%
Santa Clara 3.25 5 8.25%
Santa Cruz 3.25 5 8.25%
Shasta 3.25 5 8.25%
Sierra 3.25 5 8.25%
Siskiyou 3.25 5 8.25%
Solano 3.25 5 8.25%
Sonoma 3.25 5 8.25%
Stanislaus 3.25 5 8.25%
Sutter 3.25 5 8.25%
Tehama 3.25 5 8.25%
Trinity 3.25 5 8.25%
Tulare 3.25 5 8.25%
Tuolumne 3.25 5 8.25%
Ventura 3.25 5 8.25%
Yolo 3.25 5 8.25%
Yuba 3.25 5 8.25%

**March data used when April data is unavailable*The data shown has been calculated using the percent change in CPI from April 2018 to April 2019 as published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the California Department of Industry Relations

October 8th, 2019: Governor Newsom signs AB 1482 into law.

October 8th, 2019: Governor Newsom is scheduled to sign AB 1482 today, October 8th, 2019 in Oakland.  The ReLISTO rental calculator will be adjusted to meet the demands of the law and be fully implemented when the bill goes into effect January, 2020.  Please be aware that although the bill goes into effect in January, its retroactive to March 2019.

October 4th, 2019:  Governor Newsom is set to sign AB 1482 into law over the next few days.  ReLISTO will be placing a banner on it calculator to ensure all users are made aware.

September 20th, 2019: California Statewide rent control may be coming.  If signed by California Governor Gavin Newsom, AB-1482  The Tenant Protection Act of 2019 will restrict rent increases to a maximum of 5% plus the  regional cost of living.  Originally we opposed the law since we prefer to allow the market to be free of regulation, but if a law had to be passed, this is a fair and balanced one.

To assist both landlords and residents,  ReLISTO will be modifying our current California calculator to accommodate this new law. In the interim here are some key elements of the law that landlords need to be aware of:

    1. January 1, 2020 Rent Modification. If you raised rent on or after March 2019, you may need to make an adjustment in the amount due for January’s rent.
    2. Return of Overpaid Rent: If rent was raised since March 2019 for an amount greater than allowed, the owner is not obligated to return the overage.
    3. Property Types: Law is focused on multi-family units. Condos and detached homes unless owned by a corporation appear exempt.
    4. San Francisco Owners Banked Increases- Are you a SF landlord who has been banking their rent increases? If you are, then as of January 2020, you can only use up to the yearly maximum as restricted by the State.  In the table below, we have listed out the maximum increases currently  allowed for San Francisco.  Landlords had the option of not taking these increases and banking them till later. For example, if the last increase was in 2013, then the landlord would be allowed in 2019/2020 to ask for a 10.9% increase.  Under this new law, this would no longer be allowed.
  • March 1, 2019–February 29, 2020 2.6%
  • March 1, 2018 –February 28, 2019 1.6%
  • March 1, 2017 –February 28, 2018 2.2%
  • March 1, 2016 –February 28, 2017 1.6%
  • March 1, 2015 –February 29, 2016 1.9%
  • March 1, 2014 –February 28, 2015 1.0%

Total Banked 10.9%

 

We still do not know everything about the law or how/who will be administering it. ReLISTO is in contact with key state figures to make sure we have a complete understanding as we build the next version of the allowable rent increase calculator for California. We will be updating this blog post as things progress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Floating Staircases

ReLISTO- Build Floating Staircase for your Rental

In San Francisco,  floating staircases generate higher rents.  As such,  ReLISTO   prices these type of rental properties higher than similar properties in the same neighborhood; We know they’re  are in high demand with our tenant customers.

Due to state code requirements, owner must build floating staircases  to specific standards. These standards prevent the  building of a “true” floating staircase since rails must be present on each side.  Rails help steady the user while ascending/descending thereby helping avoid falls.  On the downside, it counters the minimalist aesthetics and most unfortunately, at a time we all want home prices to fall, dramatically increases the cost to build.  In San Francisco, standard floating staircases will have glass on the open side.

ReLISTO helps San Francisco and Central Coast owners lease and manage their properties. We  secure qualified tenants, effectively manage each property and take  care of each resident.  We as part of our capital improvement program are happy to help our owners evaluate the benefits of converting their staircase. If right for our owner, our management team will even help manage the build as part of our standard service.

 

 

 

 

 

State of California Updates the Three Day Notice Rule

New three day notice rules for the State of California  go into effect September 1, 2009.  Moving forward weekend and holidays may no longer be counted as a “day”.  ReLISTO a residential and full property management service company for San Francisco  has already incorporated this into our workflow to ensure our landlords stay compliant with the law  and any notice provided is done so correctly. Below is the summary and recommendation from the San Francisco Apartment Association regarding this matter.
“Under a law taking effect September 1, 2019, weekends and court holidays will no longer count toward the three-day notice period and the five-day period for responding to an unlawful-detainer summons and complaint. For example, under the new law, the deadline to pay rent for a three-day notice served given on a Friday wouldn’t be due until Wednesday— two days later than the current Monday deadline.
Previously, weekends and court holidays could count toward these notice periods, although a notice could not expire on weekend or court holiday.
To ensure compliance with the new law, AB 2343, SFAA recommends that the new method of counting should be used for three day notices served on or after August 29, 2019 and for complaints served on or after August 27, 2019.”

Renovate Right- Making the most of your turnover dollars

Landlords.. Is it time to renovate your investment property? Here are two articles which   accurately reflect what  San Francisco tenants are seeking for 2019/2020.

We appreciate the costs associated with making such significant modifications to a property.  In San Francisco  such investments will pay for themselves with higher rents and reduced vacancies.

Have questions on what renters are seeking? Give us a call, we are here to help San Francisco landlords

 

 

 

Happy 4th Holiday Hours

Happy 4th of July San Francisco! ReLISTO residential leasing and management will be honoring today’s holiday and our great team of agents and staff with limited hours.

We work very hard to get our properties leased asap so agents are still around to close rent properties. Of course our 24/7 management team is always on to care for each property and resident.

Office will be again open on July 5th.

Happy 4th of July!!

 

Caring for your home

SF  Bay Area Landlords: ReLISTO is focused on caring for each and every property like it was own. This care extends to include not only paying the bills and collecting rent, but proactively being engaged to ensure your property maintains its value and your tenants are happy. Contact us if you’re in the market for quality #propertymanagement 

ReLISTO on ABC News!

Christian Elbeck from ReLISTO was  featured on ABC news June 19th, 2019.  It was a story on how many of San Francisco’s residents join with others to lease larger homes and split living costs. The rooms utilized to accomplish this are sometimes unconventional, with housemates using a dining, fainting or laundry room as a bedrooms. This is done without the consent of the Agent or Owner but its being done to distribute the rent to a manageable amount for each resident. For some, its not a matter of financial need but rather a desire to live in a community.

Regardless of reason, San Francisco is in dire need of more housing. Housing should include not only conventional apartments and houses but also micro apartments and co-living homes (dorms for adults).

https://abc7news.com/business/the-highs-and-lows-of-renting-in-sf/5353960/
Continue reading “ReLISTO on ABC News!”